Jobs Online

Jobs Online is a regular data series that measures changes in online job advertisements from four internet job boards — Seek, Trade Me Jobs, Education Gazette and Kiwi Health Jobs.

Jobs Online monthly data release

Jobs Online Monthly Unadjusted Series from May 2007 to May 2021 [CSV, 31 KB]

Jobs Online quarterly release

Overview of key trends

  • Online job advertisement activity is yet to return to pre-COVID levels, but there has been strong recovery since the March 2020 quarter.
  • Online advertisements fell by 0.6 per cent during the March 2021 quarter, but grew by 10.1 per cent from the level in March 2020. But over the past two years to March 2021, online vacancies decreased by 11.6 per cent. While we are seeing a bounce back from a year ago, online job advertising activity remains below the pre-COVID levels in the March 2019 quarter.
  • By industry, the strongest increases during the quarter were seen in the Health care (up 7.5 per cent) and Primary (up 6.9 per cent) industries. These industries showed a faster return to their March 2019 pre-COVID levels.
  • By occupation, the Machinery operators & drivers group had the strongest percentage increase (up 3.4 per cent) in online advertising during the March 2021 quarter, followed by Labourers (up 2.8 per cent). These occupation groups were more resilient relative to other major occupation groups.
  • Job advertisements decreased slightly across all skill levels during the March 2021 quarter. While there was recovery in job advertisements for all skill levels over the year, they are still yet to return to pre-COVID levels.
  • Online advertised vacancies grew during the March 2021 quarter in six out of ten regions, especially in the rural regions. The Nelson/Tasman/Marlborough/West Coast (up 5.2 per cent) and Northland (up 4.1 per cent) regions saw the biggest growth in online vacancies.

Jobs online quarterly report - March 2021 [PDF, 1.3 MB]

Quarterly release data files

Note: The file 'Jobs Online Detailed occupational data – March 2021 quarter' is now a csv file and the formats of the variable names have changed.

Jobs Online Detailed occupational data - March 2021 quarter  [CSV, 9 KB]

Jobs Online Seasonally adjusted data - March 2021 quarter [XLSX, 72 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies trend quarterly [XLSX, 71 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies by Industry seasonally adjusted quarterly [XLSX, 134 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies by Industry trend quarterly [XLSX, 135 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies by Occupation seasonally adjusted quarterly [XLSX, 111 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies by Occupation trend quarterly [XLSX, 112 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies by Skilled/Unskilled seasonally adjusted quarterly [XLSX, 39 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies by Skilled/Unskilled trend quarterly [XLSX, 38 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies by Skills seasonally adjusted quarterly [XLSX, 79 KB]

Jobs Online Vacancies by Skills trend quarterly [XLSX, 73 KB]

Jobs Online Quarterly AVI growth charts [CSV, 44 KB]

All the trend data in the above Excel files is available in this consolidated file [CSV, 562 KB]

About Jobs Online

Job vacancies are an important indicator of labour demand and changes in the economy.

Jobs Online measures changes in online job advertisements from four internet job boards – SEEK, Trade Me Jobs, Education Gazette and Kiwi Health Jobs. Job vacancies are an important indicator of labour demand and changes in the economy.

The Jobs Online trend series is used as the primary indicator as it reduces the month-to-month volatility. We publish a detailed report every three months.

The relationship between job advertisements and labour demand is complex, particularly when disaggregated at an industry, occupation and regional level.

For example, an increase in job advertisements by a particular industry may indicate:

  • the industry is expanding and looking for new workers, or
  • the industry has a high rate of churn (workers are moving between businesses, but overall employment is not necessarily increasing).

Likewise, declining job advertising can signal:

  • reduced headcount in an industry, or
  • the industry is using alternatives to advertising in their hiring process (such as word-of-mouth or social networks).

With these caveats in mind, data from Jobs Online tracks well with other labour market indicators, such as the unemployment rate.

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Last updated: 11 June 2021