Jobs online

Jobs Online monthly report - June 2017

Jobs Online measures changes in online job advertisements from three internet job boards – SEEK, Trade Me Jobs and the Education Gazette. Information on job vacancies is an important indicator of labour demand. The trend series is used as the primary indicator as it reduces the month-to-month volatility.

Future changes

Three significant but small changes will be made to Jobs Online next month. Vacancy data from Kiwi Health Jobs will be included. The method used for seasonal-adjustment will be slightly adjusted. Indices will be rebased to August 2010 (previously we used May 2007).

Highlights

  • The All Vacancies Index remained steady with an increase of 0.5 per cent in June 2017, compared to 0.9 percent – the average monthly growth since June 2015. Over the past year, online vacancies increased by 10.6 per cent.
  • Vacancies increased in five out of eight industry groups. Amongst the biggest contributors were hospitality and tourism (up 1.2 per cent), and accounting, human resources, legal and administration (up 0.7 per cent).  The biggest fall was for information technology (down 0.9 per cent) industries.
  • Vacancies increased in seven out of eight occupation groups. The largest increases were for machinery drivers (up 3.1 per cent) and labourers (up 2.6 per cent).
  • Vacancies increased in four out of five skill levels. The largest increases were in unskilled (up 2.0 per cent), followed by semi-skilled (up 1.5 per cent) and low-skilled (up 1.2 per cent) occupations.

 

Figure 1: All Vacancies Index
Seasonally adjusted and trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 1. All Vacancies Index

Data table for Figure 1

Biggest increases in job vacancies for hospitality and accounting industry groups

In June, job vacancies increased in five out of eight industry groups (see Table 1). Amongst the biggest contributors were hospitality and tourism (up 1.2 per cent), and accounting, human resources, legal and administration (up 0.7 per cent). The biggest fall was for information technology (down 0.9 per cent). Over the year, growth occurred in seven out of eight industry groups.

 

Table 1: All Vacancies Index by industry group, trend series
Industry
Monthly change
(May 17 - Jun 17)
Annual change
(Jun 16 - Jun 17)
Accounting, human resources, legal and administration [image] Up arrow. 0.7% [image] Up arrow. 0.5%
Construction and engineering [image] Down arrow. 0.2% [image] Up arrow. 15.3%
Education and training [image] Up arrow. 0.6% [image] Up arrow. 10.5%
Healthcare and medical [image] Down arrow. 0.3% [image] Up arrow. 5.4%
Hospitality and tourism [image] Up arrow. 1.2% [image] Up arrow. 14.5%
Information technology [image] Down arrow. 0.9% [image] Down arrow. 13.3%
Sales, retail, marketing and advertising [image] Up arrow. 0.1% [image] Up arrow. 7.6%
Other [image] Up arrow. 1.9% [image] Up arrow. 21.5%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 10.6%
* The totals may not line up as each industry is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

 

Figure 2: All Vacancies Index by industry
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 2: Vacancies by industry

Data table for Figure 2

 

Biggest increases in job vacancies for machinery drivers and labourers occupation groups

In June, vacancies increased in seven out of eight occupation groups. The largest increases were for machinery drivers (up 3.1 per cent) and labourers (up 2.6 per cent). Over the year, job vacancies grew in all occupation groups.

Table 2: All Vacancies Index by occupation group, trend series
Occupation
Monthly change
(May 17 - Jun 17)
Annual change
(Jun 16 - Jun 17)
Managers [image] Up arrow. 0.2% [image] Up arrow. 8.4%
Professionals [image] Up arrow. 0.3% [image] Up arrow. 4.4%
Technicians and trades workers [image] Up arrow. 1.2% [image] Up arrow. 10.0%
Clerical and administration [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 9.5%
Community and personal services [image] Down arrow. 0.3% [image] Up arrow. 5.7%
Sales [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 13.9%
Machinery drivers and operators [image] Up arrow. 3.1% [image] Up arrow. 32.5%
Labourers [image] Up arrow. 2.6% [image] Up arrow. 24.5%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 10.6%
* The totals may not line up as each occupation is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

 

Figure 3: All Vacancies Index by occupation
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 3: All Vacancies Index by occupation

Data table for figure 3

 

Biggest increase in unskilled vacancies

In June, vacancies increased in four out of five skill levels. The largest increases were for unskilled (up 2.0 per cent), followed by semi-skilled (up 1.5 per cent) and low skilled and (up 1.2 per cent) occupations. Growth was strongest for the unskilled occupations, while vacancies fell for skilled occupations (down 0.2 per cent). Over the year, job vacancies increased in all skill levels.

Table 3: All Vacancies Index by skill level, trend series
Occupation
Monthly change
(May 17 - Jun 17)
Annual change
(Jun 16 - Jun 17)
Skill level 1 (highly skilled) [image] Up arrow. 0.3% [image] Up arrow. 4.3%
Skill level 2 (skilled) [image] Down arrow. 0.2% [image] Up arrow. 9.6%
Skill level 3 (semi-skilled) [image] Up arrow. 1.5% [image] Up arrow. 11.4%
Skill level 4 (low skilled) [image] Up arrow. 1.2% [image] Up arrow. 15.1%
Skill level 5 (unskilled) [image] Up arrow. 2.0% [image] Up arrow. 20.7%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 10.6%
* The totals may not line up as each skill level is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

 

Figure 4: All Vacancies Index by skill level
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 4 All Vacancies Index by skill level

Data table for figure 4

 

Highest job vacancies increase in the Nelson/Tasman/ Marlborough/West Coast region

Over the past month, the number of vacancies increased in all ten regions. The biggest increase was in Nelson/Tasman/Marlborough/West Coast (up 2.2 per cent). Over the year, the number of vacancies increased in all ten regions.

Table 5: All Vacancies Index by region, trend1 series (Aug 2010 = 100)
Region
Monthly change
(May 17 - Jun 17)
Annual change
(Jun 16 - Jun 17)
Northand [image] Up arrow. 1.1% [image] Up arrow. 24.4%
Auckland [image] Up arrow. 0.3% [image] Up arrow. 8.3%
Bay of Plenty [image] Up arrow. 1.0% [image] Up arrow. 7.9%
Waikato [image] Up arrow. 0.4% [image] Up arrow. 18.9%
Gisborne/Hawke's Bay [image] Up arrow. 0.9% [image] Up arrow. 18.8%
Manawatu Wanganui/Taranaki [image] Up arrow. 0.7% [image] Up arrow. 18.7%
Wellington [image] Up arrow. 0.4% [image] Up arrow. 6.6%
Nelson/Tasman/Marlborough/
West Coast
[image] Up arrow. 2.2% [image] Up arrow. 31.0%
Canterbury [image] Up arrow. 0.7% [image] Up arrow. 7.6%
Otago/Southland [image] Up arrow. 1.1% [image] Up arrow. 21.1%
1 Longer time series for a five regions grouping. The values and directions of change reported in table 5 of this report may differ to table 1 in the five region report as the length of the data series is shorter (August 2010 compared with May 2007) and the seasonal adjustment process does not adjust for Easter.

 

Figure 5: All Vacancies Index by region,
Trend series (Aug 2010=100)

[image] Figure 5; All Vacancies Index by region

Data table for Figure 5

 

Revisions

Jobs Online is adjusted for seasonal variations. This may lead to noticeable revisions of previously published figures towards the end of the data series.

Table 6: Revisions summary – All Vacancies Index – trend
Month
All Vacancies Index
Monthly
Annual
Revised
Previously Published*
Revised
Previously Published*
Percentage change (%)
Feb 17 0.7% 0.7% 13.2% 13.4%
Mar 17 0.7% 0.7% 13.0% 13.2%
Apr 17 0.6% 0.7% 12.4% 12.7%
May 17 0.5% 0.6% 11.4% 11.8%

* Figures published last month.

For further information

For more information on Jobs Online, see the Background and Methodology report [PDF 905KB].

You can contact us at jobsonline@mbie.govt.nz.