Jobs online

Jobs Online monthly report - November 2016

Jobs Online measures changes in online job advertisements from three internet job boards – SEEK, Trade Me Jobs and the Education Gazette. The trend series is used as the primary indicator as it reduces the month-to-month volatility.

Highlights

  • The All Vacancies Index increased by 0.9 per cent in November 2016.
  • Vacancies increased in six out of eight industry groups. The main contributors were construction and engineering (up 2.2 per cent) and healthcare and medical (up 1.2 per cent).
  • Vacancies increased in all of the eight occupation groups. The largest increases were for labourers (up 2.1 per cent), machinery operators and drivers (up 1.9 per cent), and sales (up 1.4 per cent).
  • Vacancies increased in all five skill levels. Vacancies for unskilled jobs had the biggest increase (up 2.3 per cent), followed by low skilled (up 1.4 per cent).
  • Vacancies increased in eight out of ten regions. Vacancies grew most strongly in Auckland (up 1.6 per cent) and Otago/Southland (up 1.5 per cent) and Gisborne/Hawke’s Bay (up 1.2 per cent). The only falls were in Wellington (down 0.6 per cent) and Canterbury (down 0.5 per cent).

Figure 1: All Vacancies Index
Seasonally adjusted and trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 1. All Vacancies Index

Data table for Figure 1

Job vacancies grew in November

Vacancies advertised online grew in November. The All Vacancies Index increased by 0.9 per cent. The biggest increases were in the labourers’ occupation group (up 2.1 per cent) and construction and engineering (up 2.2 per cent). Over the past year, online vacancies increased by 12.2 per cent.

The steady growth in the All Vacancies Index is consistent with the November 2016 ANZ Business Outlook1 which showed that business confidence is remains high, with only a small reduction for November. In addition, 25 per cent of firms, particularly in the construction and agriculture sector, reported an intention to hire more people over the coming year.

Job vacancies increased in six out of eight industry groups

In November, job vacancies increased in six of the eight industry groups (see Table 1). The biggest contributors were construction and engineering (up 2.2 per cent) and healthcare and medical (up 1.2 per cent). The only fall was information technology (down 0.6 per cent).

 

Table 1: All Vacancies Index by industry group, trend series
Industry
Monthly change
(Oct 16 - Nov 16)
Annual change
(Nov 15 - Nov 16)
Accounting, human resources, legal and administration [image] Up arrow. 0.4% [image] Up arrow. 6.2%
Construction and engineering [image] Up arrow. 2.2% [image] Up arrow. 15.9%
Education and training [image] Up arrow. 0.2% [image] Up arrow. 15.7%
Healthcare and medical [image] Up arrow. 1.2% [image] Up arrow. 9.9%
Hospitality and tourism [image] No change N/C [image] Up arrow. 17.2%
Information technology [image] Down arrow. 0.6% [image] Up arrow. 0.5%
Sales, retail, marketing and advertising [image] Up arrow. 0.9% [image] Up arrow. 11.6%
Other [image] Up arrow. 1.7% [image] Up arrow. 17.1%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.9% [image] Up arrow. 12.2%
* The totals may not line up as each industry is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

Over the year to November, job vacancies increased in all industry groups. The biggest increase was in hospitality and tourism (up 17.2 per cent), followed by construction and engineering (up 15.9 per cent, and education and training (up 15.7 per cent).

 

Figure 2: All Vacancies Index by industry
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 2: Vacancies by industry

Data table for Figure 2

 

Job vacancies increased in all occupation groups

In November, vacancies increased in all eight occupation groups. The largest increases were for labourers (up 2.1 per cent), machinery operators and drivers (up 1.9 per cent), and community and personal services (up 1.6 per cent).

Table 2: All Vacancies Index by occupation group, trend series
Occupation
Monthly change
(Oct 16 - Nov 16)
Annual change
(Nov 15 - Nov 16)
Managers [image] Up arrow. 0.4% [image] Up arrow. 13.5%
Professionals [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 5.3%
Technicians and trades workers [image] Up arrow. 0.7% [image] Up arrow. 14.7%
Clerical and administration [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 7.9%
Community and personal services [image] Up arrow. 1.6% [image] Up arrow. 8.8%
Sales [image] Up arrow. 1.4% [image] Up arrow. 13.4%
Machinery drivers and operators [image] Up arrow. 1.9% [image] Up arrow. 25.8%
Labourers [image] Up arrow. 2.1% [image] Up arrow. 24.0%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.9% [image] Up arrow. 12.2%
* The totals may not line up as each occupation is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

Over the year, job vacancies increased in all eight occupation groups. The biggest increase was for machinery drivers and operators (up 25.8 per cent), followed by labourers (up 24.0 per cent). These reflected industry trends in job vacancies growth.

 

Figure 3: All Vacancies Index by occupation
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 3: Vacancies by occupation

Data table for figure 3

 

Job vacancies increased in all skill levels

In November, all vacancies increased across all skill levels. The largest increases were in unskilled (up 2.3 per cent), and low skilled (up 1.4 per cent)[2] occupations.

Table 3: All Vacancies Index by skill level, trend series
Occupation
Monthly change
(Oct 16 - Nov 16)
Annual change
(Nov 15 - Nov 16)
Skill level 1 (highly skilled) [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 7.5%
Skill level 2 (skilled) [image] Up arrow. 0.3% [image] Up arrow. 12.3%
Skill level 3 (semi-skilled) [image] Up arrow. 0.8% [image] Up arrow. 13.9%
Skill level 4 (low skilled) [image] Up arrow. 1.4% [image] Up arrow. 14.8%
Skill level 5 (unskilled) [image] Up arrow. 2.3% [image] Up arrow. 21.6%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.9% [image] Up arrow. 12.2%
* The totals may not line up as each skill level is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

Over the year, job vacancies increased in all skill levels. The biggest increase was for unskilled (up 21.6 per cent), followed by low skilled (up 14.8 per cent) vacancies.

 

Figure 4: All Vacancies Index by skill level
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 4: Vacancies by skill level

Data table for figure 4

 

Fastest growing occupations

Table 4 expands on Table 2, showing the fastest growing occupations in more detail.

Table 4: Annual percentage change in advertised job vacancies*
  4-digit ANZSCO title
% change Nov
2015 to Nov 2016
Managers
1 Conference and Event Organisers 57%
2 Health and Welfare Services Managers 44%
3 Corporate Services Managers 30%
4 Construction Managers 24%
5 Call or Contact Centre and Customer Service Managers 22%
Professionals
1 Environmental Scientists 98%
2 Multimedia Specialists and Web Developers 76%
3 Auditors, Company Secretaries and Corporate Treasurers 50%
4 Other Engineering Professionals 45%
5 Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers 41%
Technicians and Trades Workers
1 Other Building and Engineering Technicians 83%
2 Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics 63%
3 Motor Mechanics 53%
4 Mechanical Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians 50%
5 Civil Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians 40%
Community and personal services
1 Security Officers and Guards 52%
2 Other Hospitality Workers 34%
3 Tourism and Travel Advisers 22%
Clerical and administration
1 Other Clerical and Office Support Workers 102%
2 Office Managers 30%
3 Transport and Despatch Clerks 23%
4 Secretaries 19%
5 General Clerks 6%
Sales
1 Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers 43%
2 Motor Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Salespersons 28%
3 Sales Assistants (General) 14%
Machinery drivers
 1 Delivery Drivers 81%
2 Agricultural, Forestry and Horticultural Plant Operators 67%
3 Earthmoving Plant Operators 33%
4 Truck Drivers 30%
Labourers
1 Concreters 109%
2 Caretakers 78%
3 Packers 51%
*Occupation titles are based on a 4-digit ANZSCO classification.
Vacancies are summed over three months.
*See all the detailed occupation data.

Job vacancies increased in most regions over the past month

Over the past month, the number of vacancies increased in eight out of ten regions. The biggest increases were in Auckland (up 1.6 per cent), Otago/Southland (up 1.5 per cent) and Gisborne/Hawke’s Bay (up 1.2 per cent). The only falls were in Wellington (down 0.6 per cent) and Canterbury (down 0.5 per cent).

Table 5: All Vacancies Index by region, trend1 series (Aug 2010 = 100)
Region2
Monthly change
(Oct 16 - Nov 16)
Annual change
(Nov 15 - Nov 16)
Northand [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 13.9%
Auckland [image] Up arrow. 1.6% [image] Up arrow. 14.4%
Bay of Plenty [image] Up arrow. 0.8% [image] Up arrow. 25.7%
Waikato [image] Up arrow. 0.9% [image] Up arrow. 23.7%
Gisborne/Hawke's Bay [image] Up arrow. 1.2% [image] Up arrow. 25.2%
Manawatu Wanganui/Taranaki [image] Up arrow. 0.9% [image] Up arrow. 8.2%
Wellington [image] Down arrow. 0.6% [image] Up arrow. 5.7%
Nelson/Tasman/Marlborough/
West Coast
[image] Up arrow. 0.2% [image] Up arrow. 17.0%
Canterbury [image] Down arrow. 0.5% [image] Down arrow. 2.3%
Otago/Southland [image] Up arrow. 1.5% [image] Up arrow. 18.8%
1 Longer time series for a five regions grouping. The values and directions of change reported in table 5 of this report may differ to table 1 in the five region report as the length of the data series is shorter (October 2010 compared with May 2007) and the seasonal adjustment process does not adjust for Easter

Over the year, the number of vacancies increased in nine out of ten regions. The biggest increases were in Bay of Plenty (up 25.7 per cent) and Gisborne/Hawke’s Bay (up 25.2 per cent). Vacancies fell in Canterbury (down 2.3 per cent).

 

Figure 5: All Vacancies Index by region,
Trend series (Aug 2010=100)

[image] Figure 5; All Vacancies Index by region

Data table for Figure 5

Vacancies in Canterbury decreased over the past month

Vacancies in Canterbury fell by 0.5 per cent (see Table 5) over the past month. The decrease was driven by the clerical and administration (down 1.5 percent) and professional (down 1.3 per cent) occupation groups. The biggest increase was for labourers (up 2.3 per cent), which is consistent with the growth in the construction and engineering industry (up 0.6 per cent).

 

Figure 6: All Vacancies Index by occupation, Canterbury Region
Trend series (Aug 2010=100)

[image] Figure 6: Vacancies by occupation for Canterbury

Data table for Figure 6

 

The main drivers of the fall in vacancies in the region were accounting, HR, legal and admin (down by 1.7 per cent), education and training and IT (both down 1.4 per cent). In contrast the biggest increase was for hospitality and tourism (up 1.2 per cent).

Over the year, vacancies in Canterbury fell by 2.3 per cent. The decreases were led by IT (down 17.1per cent) and accounting, HR, legal and admin (down by 14.6 per cent). The biggest increases were for healthcare and medical (up by 12.3 per cent), followed by hospitality and tourism (up by 10.2 per cent).

 

Figure 7: All Vacancies Index by industry, Canterbury Region
Trend series (Aug 2010=100)

[image] Figure 7: Vacancies by industry for Canterbury

Data table for Figure 7

Revisions

Jobs Online is adjusted for seasonal variations. This may lead to noticeable revisions of previously published figures towards the end of the data series.

Table 6: Revisions summary – All Vacancies Index – trend
Month
All Vacancies Index
Monthly
Annual
Previously Published*
Revised
Previously Published*
Revised
Percentage change (%)
Jul 16 0.8% 0.8% 13.6% 13.7%
Aug 16 0.8% 0.8% 13.5% 13.6%
Sep 16 1.1% 1.1% 13.3% 13.3%
Oct 16 1.1% 1.1% 12.9% 12.9%

* Figures published last month.

For further information

For more information on Jobs Online, see the Background and Methodology report [PDF 905KB].

You can contact us at jobsonline@mbie.govt.nz.


Footnote

[1] ANZ Business Outlook November 2016.

[2] The Australia and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) assigns each occupation to one of five skill levels. Skill levels one, two and three are considered skilled, while positions at skill level four or five are considered low skilled or unskilled. For more details refer to ANZCO dictionary.