Jobs online

Jobs Online monthly report - April 2016

Jobs Online measures changes in job vacancies advertised by businesses on three internet job boards – SEEK, Trade Me Jobs and the Education Gazette. The trend series is used as the primary indicator as it reduces the month-to-month volatility.

Highlights

  • Online job vacancies grew in April 2016. The All Vacancies Index increased by 0.6 per cent.
  • Vacancies increased in five out of the eight industry groups. The main contributor was education and training (up 2.1 per cent).
  • Vacancies increased in half of the eight occupation groups. The largest increases were for labourers (up 3.3 per cent) and technicians and trades (up 1.3 per cent).
  • Vacancies increased in three out of five skilled occupation categories. Vacancies for semi-skilled jobs had the biggest increase (up 0.8 per cent), followed by unskilled job vacancies (up 0.7 per cent).
  • Vacancies increased in all ten regions. Over the past month, vacancies grew strongest in Bay of Plenty region (up 1.8 per cent).

Figure 1: All Vacancies Index
Seasonally adjusted and trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 1: All vacancies index

Data table for Figure 1

Increase in vacancies for April

Vacancies advertised online showed an increase in April. The All Vacancies Index increased by 0.6 per cent. The increase in vacancies was spread across five out of eight industry groups and occupation groups, with the biggest increase in the education and training (up 2.1 per cent) industry and technicians and trade workers occupation group (up 1.3 per cent).

An increase in the All Vacancies Index is consistent with the growth in employment of 1.2 per cent shown in the Household Labour Force Survey in March 2016[1].

Over the past year, online vacancies increased by 7.7 per cent.

 

Job vacancies increased in five industry groups

In April, job vacancies increased in five out of the eight industry groups (see Table 1). The biggest contributor was education and training (up 2.1 per cent). The largest decrease was information technology (down 6.6 per cent).

 

Table 1: All Vacancies Index by industry group, trend series
Industry
Monthly change
(Mar 16 - Apr 16)
Annual change
(Apr 15 - Apr 16)
Accounting, HR, legal and administration [image] Down arrow. 0.1% [image] Up arrow. 7.8%
Construction and engineering [image] Up arrow. 0.4% [image] Up arrow. 13.0%
Education and training [image] Up arrow. 2.1% [image] Up arrow. 9.5%
Healthcare and medical [image] Up arrow. 0.3% [image] Up arrow. 1.7%
Hospitality and tourism [image] Up arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 8.5%
Information technology [image] Down arrow. 0.9% [image] Down arrow. 6.6%
Sales, retail, marketing and advertising [image] No change. 0.0% [image] Up arrow. 4.6%
Other [image] Up arrow. 1.3% [image] Up arrow. 13.3%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.6% [image] Up arrow. 7.7%
* The totals may not line up as each industry is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

Over the year to April, job vacancies increased in seven out of eight of the industry groups. Among the biggest increases were construction and engineering (up 13.0 per cent), followed by education and training (up 9.5 per cent). Information technology vacancies fell by 6.6 per cent over the year.

 

Figure 2: All Vacancies Index by industry
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 2: Vacancies by industry

Data table for Figure 2

 

Job vacancies increased in half of the occupation groups

In April, vacancies increased in half the occupation groups. The largest increases were for labourers (up 3.3 per cent) and technicians and trades workers (up 1.3 per cent). The largest decrease was for sales (down 1.2 per cent).

Table 2: All Vacancies Index by occupation group, trend series
Occupation
Monthly change
(Mar 16 - Apr 16)
Annual change
(Apr 15 - Apr 16)
Managers [image] Up arrow. 0.2% [image] Up arrow. 6.8%
Professionals [image] Down arrow. 0.6% [image] Up arrow. 0.2%
Technicians and trades workers [image] Up arrow. 1.3% [image] Up arrow. 15.5%
Clerical and administration [image] Down arrow. 0.3% [image] Up arrow. 1.7%
Community and personal services [image] Down arrow. 0.5% [image] Up arrow. 8.1%
Sales [image] Down arrow. 1.2% [image] Down arrow. 2.4%
Machinery drivers and operators [image] Up arrow. 1.1% [image] Up arrow. 10.4%
Labourers [image] Up arrow. 3.3% [image] Up arrow. 26.8%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.6% [image] Up arrow. 7.7%
* The totals may not line up as each industry is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

Over the year, job vacancies increased in seven out of eight occupation groups, except sales (down 2.4 per cent). The biggest increase was for labourers (up 26.8 per cent), followed by technicians and trades workers (up 15.5 per cent).

 

Figure 3: All Vacancies Index by occupation
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 3: Vacancies by occupation

Data table for figure 3

 

Job vacancies increase in three out of five skill levels

In April, the only increases were for semi-skilled (up 0.8 per cent), followed by unskilled (up 0.7 per cent)[2] and skilled (up 0.4 per cent). These were partially offset by decreases in low skilled (down 0.6 per cent) and highly skilled (down 0.1 per cent).

Table 3: All Vacancies Index by skill level, trend series
Occupation
Monthly change
(Mar 16 - Apr 16)
Annual change
(Apr 15 - Apr 16)
Skill level 1 (highly skilled) [image] Down arrow. 0.1% [image] Up arrow. 3.2%
Skill level 2 (skilled) [image] Up arrow. 0.4% [image] Up arrow. 7.0%
Skill level 3 (semi-skilled) [image] Up arrow. 0.8% [image] Up arrow. 13.8%
Skill level 4 (low skilled) [image] Down arrow. 0.6% [image] Up arrow. 4.0%
Skill level 5 (unskilled) [image] Up arrow. 0.7% [image] Up arrow. 11.4%
Total job vacancies* [image] Up arrow. 0.6% [image] Up arrow. 7.7%
* The totals may not line up as each industry is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately. The direction in the change may not directly match the changes reported for the occupation groups as the skill levels are distrusted across some occupation groups.

Over the year, job vacancies increased in all skill levels. The biggest increase was for semi-skilled (up 13.8 per cent), followed by unskilled (up 11.4 per cent) vacancies.

 

Figure 4: All Vacancies Index by skill level
Trend series (May 2007=100)

[image] Figure 4: Vacancies by skill level

Data table for figure 4

 

Fastest growing occupations

Occupations with the highest annual percentage increases in online vacancies are shown in the table below. Over the year, the fastest growing occupations were (for managers) health and welfare services managers, (for professionals) multimedia specialists and web developers, (for technicians and trades workers) air-conditioning and refrigeration mechanics (for Community and Personal Services) other hospitality workers, (for clerical and administration) other clerical and office support workers, (for sales) real estate sales agents, (for machinery drivers) other mobile plant operators, and (for labourers) freight and furniture handlers.

Table 4: Annual percentage change in advertised job vacancies*
  4-digit ANZSCO title
% change Apr
2015 to Apr 2016
Managers
1 Health and Welfare Services Managers 51%
2 Supply and Distribution Managers 45%
3 Call or Contact Centre and Customer Service Managers 42%
4 Conference and Event Organisers 27%
5 Corporate Services Managers 23%
Professionals
1 Multimedia Specialists and Web Developers 87%
2 Occupational and Environmental Health Professionals 71%
3 Urban and Regional Planners 51%
4 Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers 48%
5 Public Relations Professionals 40%
Technicians and Trades Workers
1 Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics 96%
2 Plasterers 89%
3 Glaziers 81%
4 Floor Finishers 64%
5 Roof Tilers 62%
Community and personal services
1 Other Hospitality Workers 17%
2 Sports Coaches, Instructors and Officials 13%
Clerical and administration
1 Other Clerical and Office Support Workers 61%
2 Keyboard Operators 41%
3 Couriers and Postal Deliverers 26%
4 Personal Assistants 25%
Sales
1 Real Estate Sales Agents 27%
Machinery drivers and operators
 1 Other Mobile Plant Operators 41%
2 Other Stationary Plant Operators 27%
Labourers
1 Freight and Furniture Handlers 63%
2 Car Detailers 37%
3 Kitchenhands 28%
Occupation titles are based on a 4-digit ANZCO classification.
Vacancies are summed over three months.
*See all the detailed occupation data.

Job vacancies increased in all ten regions over the past month

Over the past month, the number of vacancies increased in all ten regions. The biggest increases were in Bay of Plenty (up 1.8 per cent), Nelson/Tasman/Marlborough/West Coast (1.6 per cent) Otago/Southland (up 1.6 per cent) and Auckland (up 1.6 per cent).

Table 5: All Vacancies Index by region, trend1 series (Aug 2010 = 100)
Region2
Monthly change
(Mar 16 - Apr 16)
Annual change
(Apr 15 - Apr 16)
Northand [image] Up arrow. 1.3% [image] Up arrow. 23.7%
Auckland [image] Up arrow. 1.6% [image] Up arrow. 27.1%
Bay of Plenty [image] Up arrow. 1.8% [image] Up arrow. 37.0%
Waikato [image] Up arrow. 1.0% [image] Up arrow. 16.3%
Gisborne/Hawke's Bay [image] Up arrow. 0.8% [image] Up arrow. 24.0%
Manawatu Wanganui/Taranaki [image] Up arrow. 0.8% [image] Up arrow. 18.6%
Wellington [image] Up arrow. 1.0% [image] Up arrow. 21.1%
Nelson/Tasman/Marlborough/
West Coast
[image] Up arrow. 1.6% [image] Up arrow. 28.6%
Canterbury [image] Up arrow. 0.1% [image] Up arrow. 4.6%
Otago/Southland [image] Up arrow. 1.6% [image] Up arrow. 15.9%
1 Longer time series for a five regions grouping. The values and directions of change reported in table 4 of this report may differ to table 1 in the five region report as the length of the data series is shorter (August 2010 compared with May 2007) and the seasonal adjustment process does not adjust for Easter.
2The totals may not line up as each industry is individually seasonally adjusted, while the total job vacancies series is seasonally adjusted separately.

 

Figure 5: All Vacancies Index by region,
Trend series (Aug 2010=100)

[image] Figure 5: Vacancies by region

Data table for Figure 5

Vacancies in Canterbury are steady over the past month

Vacancies in Canterbury were steady with growth of 0.1 per cent (see Table 5) over the past month. The increase was led by two occupation groups sales (up 1.8 per cent), followed by managers (up 1.0 per cent). The biggest decrease was for machinery drivers (down 3.0 per cent).

 

Figure 6: All Vacancies Index by occupation, Canterbury Region
Trend series (Aug 2010=100)

[image] Figure 6: Vacancies by occupation for Canterbury

Data table for Figure 6

 

Among the Canterbury industries, the largest increases were in hospitality and tourism (up 1.9 per cent), healthcare and medical (up 1.3 per cent) and education and training (up 1.2 per cent). Construction and engineering showed a large decrease (down 2.1 per cent).

 

Figure 7: All Vacancies Index by industry, Canterbury Region
Trend series (Aug 2010=100)

[image] Figure 7: Vacancies by industry for Canterbury

Data table for Figure 7

Revisions

Jobs Online is adjusted for seasonal variations. This may lead to noticeable revisions of previously published figures towards the end of the data series.

Table 6: Revisions summary – All Vacancies Index – trend
Month
All Vacancies Index
Monthly
Annual
Previously Published*
Revised
Previously Published*
Revised
Percentage change (%)
Dec 15 0.6% 1.0% 6.4% 6.6%
Jan 15 0.2% 0.5% 6.3% 6.9%
Feb 16 0.2% 0.4% 6.2% 7.1%
Mar 16 0.5% 0.7% 6.8% 7.9%

* Figures published last month.

For further information

For more information on Jobs Online, see the Background and Methodology report [PDF 905KB].

You can contact us at jobsonline@mbie.govt.nz.


Footnote

[1] Quarterly Labour Market Scorecard - May 2016

[2] The Australia and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) assigns each occupation to one of five skill levels. Skill levels one, two and three are considered skilled, while positions at skill level four or five are considered low skilled or unskilled. For more details refer to Australian Bureau of Statistics website.